CALL FOR PROPOSALS

CUMU member institutions are at the forefront of developing innovative solutions to changing educational, social, and economic challenges—work that aligns with our core public-engaged mission and expands the boundaries of institutional impacts. Through hyperlocal and regional collaborations, that are both equitable and reciprocal, CUMU members and their partners will be uniquely positioned to play an ever important role in creating new pathways for future success.

Major Themes

The 2020 CUMU Annual Conference, Beyond Boundaries: From Hyperlocal to Regional Collaborations, invites presenters to reflect on the diverse needs of our metropolitan areas and to identify collaborative approaches, not only between government, healthcare, corporate, and community partners, but also among neighboring colleges and universities and surrounding residents. Presentations should take into account the following major themes.

It’s imperative that higher education invests in local communities. CUMU members are finding success utilizing hyperlocal engagements through implementation of community-based learning, student-leadership programs, community partnerships, and volunteerism. Also contributing to success is the increased focus on measurement of engagement in order to inform and refine future projects.

Through comprehensive initiatives and partnerships, CUMU member institutions are removing barriers to college access and creating sustained pipelines into higher education for their urban and metro communities. Members are also investing in programs and leadership to ensure that once students enroll, they graduate and are not saddled with student loan debt. Students across North America are grappling with rising costs of tuition, housing, and the basic needs of food and healthcare. This struggle to afford basic necessities creates challenging learning environments. CUMU members are developing innovative programs to address homelessness, trauma, mental health, unaffordable and inadequate housing, and more.

Campuses across the CUMU membership are committed to fostering successful environments for all, regardless of personal identities, abilities, or neighborhood residence. Institutions have directed equity and inclusion efforts across all levels of higher education from course curricula to the strategic hiring of faculty and staff. Additionally, student leaders are often the ones to spur action and change on campuses. Administrators across the CUMU membership are championing student efforts by providing access to resources and expertise in order to ensure that social justice and equity endeavors are sustainable. Institutions recognize that equitable and inclusive environments strengthen communities both inside and outside of the institution while helping to develop engaged citizens and future leaders in an ever-changing global society.

Large-scale development projects are spurring investments in dis-invested neighborhoods across the CUMU membership. While CUMU members are expanding their footprints, they are doing so in ways that drive inclusive economic growth and creatively address affordable housing shortages. Development is associated with gentrification, but benefits are generally not enjoyed by existing residents. Stakeholders are utilizing multi-faceted approaches to incorporate pathways for residents to share in the employment and business development opportunities; benefit from neighborhood revitalization; and access services offered by the redevelopment.

CUMU members are examining their role as job creators to fill their own vacancies and needs, but also on how they can support regional and industry demands. Anchor Learning Network members, are collaborating with one another to strategize how longtime, local residents can benefit from positions at their institutions and many others are collaborating with local industries and organizations to establish mutually beneficial programs; Graduates are developing transferrable skills and businesses are benefitting from more prepared employees. Finally, CUMU members have developed programs that work with “opportunity youth,” meaning young people neither in school nor the workforce, in order to reconnect them to educational and employment opportunities. These individuals face immense challenges, but members are working on how to support these young people.

Colleges and universities spend over $43 billion on goods and services annually. Many CUMU member institutions, specifically Anchor Learning Network participants, are changing procurement policies to redirect purchasing dollars to local businesses. By committing to purchase local goods and services, CUMU member institutions encourage local business development and growth that helps to create more healthy and stable communities.

CUMU members are increasingly collaborating with other higher education institutions, local governments, and corporate and nonprofit leaders to more efficiently and effectively meet the needs of the populations they serve. Bringing experts together can lead to stronger social and economic outcomes for residents, helping reach both institutional and regional goals.

Presentation Formats and Approaches

People attend the CUMU Annual Conference to ‘dig in’ and connect on common themes. The CUMU Annual Conference is comprised of multiple presentation styles and formats. Our hope is that you—thought leaders, problem solvers, educators—will have more in-depth, meaningful conversations around subjects that matter to you and your campuses.

Have you led a successful project, partnership, program, or case-study that is working at your institution? Best practices presentations should showcase your work and/or methodologies, highlight what worked, and present positive outcomes. Typically, these presentations utilize presentation tools.

Time Allotment: 30 minutes, inclusive of Q&A. Presentations will be grouped with additional, related presentations into a 60 minute session.

Participation: A maximum of two people can participate as speakers in one 30-minute best practices presentation.

Proposal Requirement:

  • Presentation title
  • Presenter(s) information (name, title, affiliation, email address)
  • Abstract (250 word limit)
  • Learning outcomes

What keeps you up at night? These think tank style sessions are designed to provide a platform for dialogue among attendees on hot topics and issues facing our campuses and communities. Community conversations are not about sharing or defining solutions; they are conversations that should define problems, ideas, or practices that you have given thought to. The presenter in this session serves more as a facilitator than a presenter. The facilitator (presenter) will design a session that creates a thought-provoking and interactive experience for attendees.

Time Allotment: 60 minute session

Participation: No more than three facilitators (presenters) per session

Moderation: A facilitator (presenter) will introduce the issue or question by providing background information and then facilitate an interactive experience/exercise for attendees.

Proposal Requirement:

  • Presentation title
  • Facilitator information (name, title, affiliation, email address)
  • Abstract (250 word limit)
  • Description of how the session will be designed (needs to specifically describe approach/exercises/activities)
  • Ideal audience size to make your session successful?

Attendee Outcome: Attendees should leave the session with new perspectives and an interest in further exploring the topic discussed.

Lighting presentations are quick, engaging, inspirational, and most importantly, fun. Presenters should highlight an idea, success, approach, or trend; bring to light an issue or challenge; or give a personal perspective on a topic. Lightning presentations are not intended to provide the details of your work but rather inspire attendees to seek you out to learn more.

Have questions about whether a lightning session is a good fit for you? Contact CUMU Headquarters to learn more and get your questions answered.

Time Allotment: 5 minutes.

Participation: One person per each five minute presentation. Presentations will be grouped into a 60 minute session that will allow for follow-up questions and direct interaction between presenters and session attendees.

Moderation: An experienced facilitator will provide presenters with clear guidelines and tips for making the most of their short amount of time.

Proposal Requirement:

  • Presentation title
  • Presenter information (name, title, affiliation, email address)
  • Abstract (250 word limit)

Sample Presentation Titles:

  • How ABC University is leveraging football game-days to open the doors to new community partners.
  • A big left turn in my career trajectory based on one meeting with a local school principal.

Attendee Outcome: Attendees should be inspired to learn more.

Have you experienced success in the implementation of new processes, infrastructure, or policy approaches related to addressing a challenge or issue in your community or institution? Mini Workshops should be focused; inform on their topic; and engage attendees around a question or task. Presenters could create an interactive component where attendees may work individually or in small groups. At its core, these are how-to sessions.

Time Allotment: 60 minutes

Participation: A maximum of three people can participate as speakers in one 60-minute mini-workshop presentation.

Moderation: None

Proposal Requirement:

  • Presentation title
  • Presenter information (name, title, affiliation, email address)
  • Abstract (250 word limit)
  • Identification of learning outcomes for attendees
  • Workshop instructional method to demonstrate interactivity
  • What do you need to make your session successful (room set-up, technology, etc.)?
  • Ideal audience size to make your session successful?

Attendee Outcome: Attendees should expect to leave with actionable next steps. Presenters should provide attendees with supplementary materials or information for gathering those materials online.

Panel presentations are question and answer sessions with a panel of individuals focused on a specific topic. Panel presentations are not a collection of individual presentations, but a dialogue. A panel should avoid creating a showcase of something you are doing well, but rather a panel should include diverse view points and perspectives and ideally include community partners.

Time Allotment: 60 minute session.

Participation: A panel presentation is a great way to focus on one metropolitan area. It could also be a good opportunity to bring together individuals from different universities or different parts of the country. A maximum of five people can participate in a panel presentation.

Moderation: A panel moderator will be included as part of the panel presentation team and will introduce the panelists and guide the dialogue to ensure the discussion stays on track.

Proposal Requirement: 

  • Presentation title
  • Panel presenter participant Information (name, title, affiliation, email address)
  • Abstract (250 word limit)
  • Identification of learning outcomes for attendees

Attendee Outcome: Attendees should expect to gain insight and hear alternative perspectives on a topic.

A poster session is the presentation of information illustrated using a 2’ x 3’ poster board. This is a great opportunity to gain significant attention for your work in a more social atmosphere. Poster displays will be available for viewing during a joint reception and poster session open to all attendees. Poster sessions operate under a “free-flowing” format as attendees will typically come-and-go.

Time Allotment: Poster session will be 60 minutes in total.

Participation: No more than two presenters per poster.

Moderation: None

Proposal Requirement:

  • Presentation title
  • Presenter information (name, title, affiliation, email address)
  • Abstract (250 word limit)

Attendee Outcome: Attendees should expect to leave with new ideas and approaches to issues and opportunities relevant to urban and metropolitan universities and the cities in which they reside and serve.

KEY PROPOSAL INFO

  • Call opens: February 3
  • Call closes: April 24
  • Notifications sent: June 8
  • Presenter acceptances due: June 22
  • Conference begins: October 19
SUBMIT PROPOSAL